NAMIBIA AND OKAVANGO DELTA OVERLAND ADVENTURE | Accommodated
Menu

14 Day Namibia & Okavango Delta Overland Adventure (Comfort)

R18,650

+ Single Supplement ZAR 3400

+ Optional Activity Package ZAR 16980


View next year's price

Currency conversions estimated

Best Price Gaurantee!
Certified Reviews
Loading map...
Tour Style Accommodated
Countries Visited Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe
Starts Swakopmund
Ends Victoria Falls
Group Size Max 20
Age Range 16 – 65 Years and older

14 Day Namibia and Okavango Delta Adventure of Namibia and the Okavango Delta awaits you.

 

 

Tour Overview

Departing from Swakopmund
Ends in
Victoria Falls

Covering exciting highlights such as the Petrified Forest in Swakopmund, the colourful Himba Tribe, Etosha National Park and Maun, the gateway to the Okavango Delta, this adventure safari is a wonderful way to explore Africa. Select departures have a small group pricing. The trip is limited to 12 travellers. Your tour sets off with 1 tour leader and a drier and both would manage food shopping and cooking. You will also be travelling in a uniquely modified overland vehicle that seats 20 fellow international travellers. Each individual gets their own baggage locker with the smallest locker size being ±35cm sq., 80cm deep. Our accommodation combines all of the outdoors and adventure that a camping trip brings but with the added comfort of bedded accommodation (2 – 4 star accommodation). All you need to bring is your own towel. The accommodation varies from place to place, making use of hotels, hostels, lodge style bungalows, chalets, permanent tented safari camps and traditional huts – majority with en-suite bathroom facilities. Your en-suite bathroom facilities do include flushing loo and hot water showers. Although the crew do most of the work a little participation from the group can make a real difference as it means that the guides have more time for you and more time to make the tour amazing so getting involved definitely enhances the tour experience. This is an adventure and everyone on tour is asked to help out with; washing up duties; food preparation if time is pressing; loading and unloading the truck; keeping the truck clean (it is your home after all for the next days and weeks). The days involve early starts and late endings, as there are often long drives between destinations but then you get to experience beautiful areas that are difficult to get too. There can be speed bumps on the way, so having an open mind and flexible approach will help you have a wonderful time and also gain the most from your African adventure.

Included

  • Meals - 13 Breakfast, 12 Lunch, 10 Dinner
  • Accommodation
  • Registered guides
  • Transport

Excluded

  • All items of a personal nature
  • Alcohol
  • Soft Drinks
  • Bottled Water
  • Snacks
  • Souvenirs
  • Tips
  • Activity Package and Optional activities

SKU: ACS0403
 

Itinerary

Day 1

Swakopmund, Namibia

Today we arrive in the adventure capital of Namibia, Swakopmund. Here you will be provided with all the information you require about the various Optional Activities on offer.

Swakopmund was founded in 1892 by German settlers and was planned to be the primary harbour of German South-West Africa. However, with the elevated amount of traffic between Germany and its colony, a port of its own was established due to Walvis Bay, situated just 33 kilometres south, being in British possession. The decision of where to build this port landed on a site just north of the Swakop River where water was freely available. With its Bavarian-style buildings, including the Altes Gefängnis prison (now converted into a public library), the prominent German architectural influence is still very evident within the town of Swakopmund. The town was originally known as ‘Tsoakhaub’, a word that was derived from the culture of Namaqua and, directly translated, means ‘excrement opening’ which is an unpleasant, but unfortunately very accurate description of the Swakop River waters when they once flooded and carried masses amounts of mud, sand, vegetation and animal corpses out into the Atlantic Ocean. This name was shortly changed to ‘Swachaub’ by German settlers, and with the declaration of Swakopmund as an independent region of German South-West Africa in the year 1896, the current use of the name ‘Swakopmund’ (meaning ‘estuary of the Swakop’ in German) came into play. Swakopmund is encircled by the Namib Desert on three sides and by the icy Atlantic waters to the west and therefore experiences a pleasant, balanced climate.

Though rainfall is scarce, the cold current of the Benguela provides moisture to the region in the form of fog that reaches as far as 140 kilometres inland. The animals and vegetation of the area have adapted to this spectacle and now rely upon this fog as a water supply. Swakopmund is renowned for its incredible selection of adventure activities, including skydiving, sand boarding, quad biking and more. Your local guides will help you with your decision on which activities you should partake in, however, if you wish to devote some time to relaxation, feel free to explore the town and enjoy the wide selection of coffee and souvenir shops available here.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Amampuri or Stay@Swakop
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Activity Package: Guided desert walk
Optional Activities: Dolphin Cruise (4/5 hours) Sky Diving, Quad Biking (2 hours), Dinner Out Swakopmund

Day 2

Khorixas, Namibia

Heading inland today, making our way to Khorixas, we make a stop at  Spitzkoppe and enjoy the granite monoliths with the guide. We pay a visit to the Petrified Forest that is situated in an old river channel. Described as ‘an occurrence of fossilized trees’, this forest was declared a national monument on the 1st of March, 1950.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Igowati Lodge or Khorixas Lodge
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Swakopmund to Khorixas ±320 km
Included Highlight: Visit Spitzkoppe and explore with a local guide

Day 3

Himba Tribe – Outjo, Namibia

Travelling toward Kamanjab today, we drive through Damaraland where we spend some time with several of the Himba people who are pastoral and easily identifiable by their original hair and dressing styles. We end the day by visiting the petrified forest in the outskirts of the town. Continuing to our camp for the night, we prepare for the following two days in Etosha National Park.

Descendants of the Herero people, the Himba continue to speak a dialect of the ancient Herero language. There are approximately 20,000 – 50,000 Himba people residing in the area of Kunene, where they have recently constructed two villages in Kamanjab. The Himba are livestock farmers who, in this arid, rough and mountainous region, breed cattle and goats. These are some of the most photographed people in the world because of their stunningly unique style of dressing as well as their fascinating lifestyle. Their style is characterised by revealing clothing made from goat skin and they accessorise with an assortment of jewellery made of shells, copper and iron – in accordance to the tribe’s hierarchy. The scarlet colour of their skin and hair is a combination of butter, ash and ochre which aids in shielding them from the severe temperatures of the desert.

Usually, the women are left to care for the children and to perform daily tasks such as the milking of livestock, whilst the men are responsible for sorting out political duties. Their villages are comprised of family farmsteads which are huts constructed around a central fire and livestock pen. Both the livestock and fire are crucial to the beliefs of the Himba in ancestor worship, the fire signifying ancestral guarding of the community.

Located a short 20 kilometres outside of town, an expertly led guided trip around the villages will give you an incredible insight into the lifestyles of the Ova-Himba – the last traditional tribe in Namibia. It will also provide incredible photographic opportunities. Here you will learn about the milking ceremony, the smoke bath, and be educated about the beliefs of the holy fire, ancestors and herbal medicine.

You will also be informed about the jewellery and hair styles that indicate the status of each individual tribe member within their society, as well as their magnificent bond with nature, their cattle and children. The money that is generated from these outings aids in sustaining the tribe in their day to day lives, affording them to purchase provisions and necessary medicines as well as giving them the opportunity to take proper care of the children in the communities.  Please bear in mind that the village is not an exhibition and you are kindly asked to respect the ways of the Himba as they would respect yours. This being said, you will be given a chance to enter the inside of one of these incredible people’s homes in order to experience their remarkable culture.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Etotongwe
Facilities: Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Khorixas to Outjo ±340 km
Activity Package: Himba Tribe Visit
Included Highlight: Visit the Petrified Forest

Day 4 - 5

Etosha National Park, Namibia

Making our way southeast to Etosha National Park, we are treated to incredible views of the vast landscapes as well as game viewing from our truck during our game drives. We enter the park and set up camp for the night. The park is a place where you will experience the most unique game viewing in Africa. After your game drive, we travel back to the campsite and we relax at their beautiful floodlit waterholes and watch animals visit for an evening drink during the night.

Etosha means ‘Great White Place’ and is dominated by an enormous salt pan which makes up part of the mighty Kalahari Basin. Originally a lake nourished by the Kunene River, the Etosha pan spreads across an entire quarter of the Etosha National Park.

The lake was dried up more than a few thousand years ago, and is currently a dust bowl made of salty clay which, from time to time, floods to the brim with water from the scarce rainfalls. This briefly provides water to the wildlife and fuels the growth of a certain type of algae that draws in birds and flamingos by the thousands. However, massive collections of wildlife congregate all through the entire year at the perpetual springs situated on the pan’s edges. This incredible abundance of wildlife makes Etosha National Park one of South Africa’s most supreme and significant game reserves. The Park covers an area of 22,270 square kilometres and is home to 114 mammal species, 340 bird species, 110 reptile species, 16 amphibian species and astonishingly, 1 species of fish.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Namutoni or Okaukuejo OR Halali OR Mokuti or Toshari Lodge
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Outjo to Etosha National Park ±170 km
Included Highlight: Afternoon and Full game drive

Etosha National Park

Day 6

Windhoek, Namibia

On our way to Windhoek, Namibia’s capital, we make a stop at a local craft market where you can purchase genuine African artworks, including carvings and paintings. Upon our arrival in Windhoek, we embark on a brief tour around the lovely city in our truck. End your day enjoying a an optional dining experience at Joe’s Beer House

Windhoek was initially given the name Ai-Gams by the Nama people, meaning ‘hot water’. This was because of the hot springs that were once a significant part of this area. The Herero people who used to dwell there, referred to it as Otjomuise meaning ‘place of steam’. There are various beliefs on how Ai-Gams/Otjomuise came to be known as Windhoek, but the most popular theory is that this name was derived from the Afrikaans word ‘Wind-Hoek’, meaning ‘corner of wind’. Another belief is that the Afrikaans people named Windhoek after the Winterhoek Mountains located in Tulbagh, South Africa, where the early Afrikaans settlers resided at one point in time. During those days of colonialism, Windhoek acted as the point of contact between the fighting Namas, led by Jan Jonker Afrikaner, and the Herero people.

Today’s Windhoek was established on the 18th of October, 1890, when Van Francois (a German settler) repaired the foundation stone of the Alte Feste fort. Throughout the next fourteen years, Windhoek gradually progressed with only the most crucial government and private building being constructed. Following 1907, the town developed rapidly as people began to migrate from the countryside to the city, and a massive flood of European settlers started to arrive from Germany and South Africa. Countless gorgeous buildings and monuments were constructed, including Heinitzburg (one of the three castles of Windhoek), the enchanting Christuskirche and The Rider statue.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Heja Game Lodge
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Etosha National Park to Windhoek ±450 km
Included Highlight: Craft market stop en-route, short walk through Windhoek with your guide
Optional Activity: Dinner at Local Restaurant

Day 7

Botswana – Ghanzi, Botswana

Departing Namibia, we make our way to the Botswana border post. After completing border formalities, we arrive at our lodging in Ghanzi and, in the evening, we are treated to an experience of traditional tribal dancing performed by the local San community.

Upon crossing the border of Botswana, we will begin to spot villagers, cattle, donkeys and sheep along the roadsides. Botswana has been independent since the year 1966 and contains three of the world’s most abundant diamond mines which have made the country rather wealthy. Botswana is presently 40 years old and is known as the African success story.

Politically stable with high economic standards and the good sense to invest in education and healthcare as well as devoid of the racial issues that have afflicted most other African countries, Botswana has the greatest economy in sub-Saharan Africa. The government uses a strategy of high income and low impact tourism, where the amount of tourists entering any area of the country is decreased by charging much more than adjacent countries, thus making it more restricting to the budgeting traveller.

Previously known as Bushmen, the San are indigenous to Southern Africa and have resided here for over 30,000 years. It is fascinating to learn about the conditions of Africa in the past and how the San managed to survive in the desert surroundings, living in peace with nature. There is a belief that the word ‘San’ meant ‘wild people who cannot farm’, but historically, they did not have a word for themselves. Now, however, they call themselves ‘Ncoakhoe’ meaning ‘red people’, but the term ‘San’ remains chief. They were roaming people, largely hunter gatherers travelling to where food and water could be found. There are only approximately 55,000 San left of which almost 60% reside in Botswana, whilst the remainder dwell in Namibia and northern South Africa.

Countless examples of their dramatic and extraordinary cave paintings can be seen peppered around Southern Africa – an indication of the truly nomadic San tracking their movements historically. Unfortunately, in the present their traditional lifestyle has been battered by colonial influence and they can now be located in the ‘squalid alcohol plagued settlements’ or on farms and cattle posts.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Ghanzi Trail Blazers
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Windhoek to Ghanzi ±520 km
Included Highlight: San Tribal dance in evening
Border Post: Namibia: Buitepos, Tel: +264 62 560401, Open: 07h00-24h00. Botswana: Mamanu, Tel: +267 (0) 659 2013/2064 Open: 07h00-24h00

Day 8 - 10

Maun – Okavango Delta, Botswana

Known as the gateway to the Okavango Delta, we spend one evening in Maun preparing for our adventure into the Delta. It is recommended you bring along a smaller bag for your stay in the Okavango as you will not need too much. For travellers not wanting to go into the Delta they will stay in Maun or the next 2 days.

The next morning we board Small planes which take us over this incredible region to our camp where we will be staying for the following two nights.

Depending on the water level, there may also be a traditional Mokoro (dug-out canoe) outing to look forward to. The evening is spent around the campfire listen to the sounds of the wilderness.

The following morning we head out for a nature walk. Returning to our camp for breakfast we spend the rest of the day relaxing before our early evening sunset cruise.

A maze of lagoons, lakes and concealed channels spreading over 17,000 square kilometres, the Okavango Delta is the world’s biggest inland delta. Originating in Angola, countless rivers merge to form the Cubango River which flows through Namibia, becoming the Kavango River and finally entering Botswana where it turns into the Okavango. Eons ago, the Okavango River flowed into a massive inland lake named Lake Makgadikgadi which is now known as the Makgadikgadi Pans. Tectonic activity disturbed the currents of the river, resulting in it backing up and thus creating what is now recognised as the Okavango Delta. This has formed a complex network of waterways that sustain a large variety of fauna and flora.

There are approximately 200,000 large mammals living in and around the Delta. On the mainland and amidst the Delta islands, lion, elephant, hyena, wild dog, buffalo, hippo and crocodile gather with an assortment of antelope and other smaller animals such as warthog, mongoose, spotted genet, monkey, bush baby and tree squirrel. Remarkably, the endangered African Wild Dog lives within the Okavango Delta, displaying one of the richest pack densities throughout Africa. The Delta is also home to over 400 species of bird including the majestic African Fish Eagle. Plenty of these creatures live in the Delta, but most simply pass through during their migrations with the summer rains to seek out renewed lush fields ready for grazing. During the beginning of winter, the countryside dries up and these animals head back to the Delta, making for spectacular game sightings as the massive numbers of prey and predators are forced together. Specific regions of the floodplains provide some of the most magnificent predator action seen anywhere in the world.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Sitatunga or Island Safari Lodge, Permanent Tents: Okavango Delta Excursion
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Ghanzi to Maun ±350 km, Maun to Okavango Delta ±30 min flight
Activity Package: Okavango Delta Excursion (Accommodated)
Optional Activity:Bushman walk

PLEASE NOTE: If you have not purchased the Activity Package, you will stay at the accommodation in Maun during the Delta Excursion for the following two nights.

Luggage Restriction: Due to the flight into the Okavango Delta your bags are limited to 10kg.  Each client will have to be weighed due to new safety regulations (please don’t take offence to this).

For more information on the Okavango Delta Excursion please click here

Okavango Delta

Day 11

Nata, Botswana

After a morning game drive out of the Delta to the airstrip and a scenic flight out of the wilderness, we will drive towards Makgadikgadi Pans (Salt Pans) and the town of Nata. If we are lucky we may spot some of the wildlife that wander in this large protected area.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Nata Lodge or Pelican Lodge
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Maun to Nata ±230 km

Day 12

Chobe National Park, Botswana

We make our way to Kasane where your afternoon is spent exploring the Chobe National Park in a 4×4 vehicle. The afternoon we are treated to a relaxing sunset river cruise on the Chobe River (situated within the National Park). Here we will be able to spot plenty of beautiful animals on the riverbanks, such as hippo, buffalo and elephants.

The second biggest park in all of Botswana, Chobe National Park spreads over approximately 10,600 square kilometres of northern Botswana. The Park forms part of the medley of lakes, islands and floodplains created from the river systems of the Kwanda, Linyanti and Chobe Rivers. This region is well-known for its enormous buffalo and elephant herds – the population of which is presently around 120,000.

The Chobe elephants migrate often and travel up to 200 kilometres from the Chobe and Linyanti rivers, where they gather during the dry season, to the pans in the southeast portion of the park during rainy season. These giants are specifically Kalahari elephants, identifiable by their frail ivory and short tusks which are possibly due to the lack of calcium in the soils. Because of their high population, much damage to vegetation is caused in certain areas and therefore, culls have been considered but never carried out due to the enormous controversy surrounding the act.

The initial inhabitants of this region were the San people, known in Botswana as the ‘Basarwa’. They were nomadic hunter-gatherers who travelled from place to place searching for the next source of food and water. The San were eventually forced out by groups of the Basubiya people and, in 1911, a congregation of Batawana moved to the area. It was decided in 1931 that a national park would be erected in order to guard the wildlife from extinction as well as to attract tourists.

During 1932, an area of approximately 24,000 square kilometres in the Chobe region was declared as a non-hunting zone. Throughout the years, the boundaries of the park have been modified and the people who have settled in the region have been progressively relocated. Chobe National Park was eventually completely rid of human occupation in the year 1975, and in 1980 (and once more in 1986) the boundaries were once again altered, growing the park to its current size.

Accommodation: Two Per Room: Thebe River Lodge
Facilities: En-suites Per Room Please visit the website of the accommodation provider for a full list of the facilities offered
Route: Nata to Kasane ±315 km
Activity Package: Chobe National Park Game Drive, Chobe National Park Sunset boat cruise
Nomad, Thebe Safaris - Family-room

Day 13 - 14

Zimbabwe – Victoria Falls, Zambia

Upon arrival in Victoria Falls town we have some time to prepare for our activities for the following day, before visiting the incredible Victoria Falls and experiencing the thunderous and powerful Zambezi. Even though the tour ends on the following day, majority of our group will spend the next day white water rafting (a thrill not to be missed!), however there are various alternatives offered by Victoria Falls, such as a walk with lions or a bungee jump from the bridge that merges Zimbabwe and Zambia.

Accommodation: Two per room: A’Zambezi  or similar
Facilities: En-suite per room, bar, swimming pool, laundry, Curio-shop, Wireless Internet and Restaurant
Route: Kasane to Victoria Falls ±100 km
Activity Package: Victoria Falls National Park Entrance
Optional Activities: Dinner out , Zambezi Sunset Cruise, Bungee Jump – Solo, Helicopter Flights, White Water Rafting

Tour ends in the morning

 

Activities

The Activity Package allows you to pre purchase select popular activities, reducing the amount of money you need to take on tour. It is not compulsory.

  • Himba Tribe visit ZAR350
  • Okavango Delta excursion ZAR14950
  • Chobe National Park boat cruise ZAR570
  • Chobe National Park game drive ZAR570
  • Vic Falls National Park entry ZAR540


Other Activities

  • Dolphin cruise
  • Skydiving
  • Sandboarding
  • Quad biking
  • Dinner out
  • Bushman walk
  • Zambezi Sunset Cruise
  • Bungee Jump – Solo
  • Helicopter Flights
  • White Water Rafting

 

Dates

Tour datesEnquire
   

Price

R18,650

+ Single Supplement ZAR 3400

+ Optional Activity Package ZAR 16980


View next year's price





R18,650

+ Single Supplement ZAR 3400

+ Activity Package (Optional) ZAR 16980

Small Group Departures ZAR 24100

View next year's price

Currency conversions estimated

Best Price Gaurantee!
Certified Reviews

Enquire now

Send us a quick question about this tour
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Hold my seat for 48 hours

  • How long do you have? Do you have particular must see?
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Let Us Help You Find Your Adventure